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2003 Omega Louis Brandt Perpetual Calendar Skeleton

Free

  • 5349.80.83
  • Box, Card, Card Holder, 2x Buckles, Push Pin

Year: 2003
Model: Louis Brandt
Case Diameter: 34mm 
Lug to Lug: 42mm
Case: Yellow Gold
Condition: No significant wear as seen
Dial: Blue
Movement: Automatic

Condition
The case is very clean with all the markings still intact. The crystals on the case and caseback have no dings or flea bites. The skeleton dial is very clean with a few very light marks on the moon from normal functioning. The movement had a recent service in 2022 and is running perfectly.

The Louis Brandt line, a luxury watch brand, was a halo product in the 1980s and 1990s, featuring gold cases and complex movements. The Louis Brandt De-Luxe Chronograph, powered by the ETA 7750 movement, was priced above other Omega watches. The watch was designed to be both high tech and modern, but still too old to be considered modern. The case is 38mm in diameter and features a thick, flat bezel and pronounced "beefy" lugs. The watch has a water resistance of 30 meters and is compatible with various OEM Omega straps. The Calibre 1156, 1157, and 1158 movements are heavily modified de-luxe variants of the Omega Calibre 1155, which is a modified version of the ETA 7750 base movement. These movements are meant to be serviced by Omega in Bienne only, and independent watchmakers cannot order replacement parts for worn parts.

The Louis Brandt Chronograph Blue Skeleton is a rare and impressive watch. Some say only four of these examples were ever produced. It features a blue skeleton and is powered by the impressively finished Omega Calibre 1117 movement. The movement is a thick, multi-plate sandwich, making it difficult to allow light from the back to the front. To make the dial unique, Omega applied blue and gold paint to a transparent sapphire, creating a floating effect. The sub-dials and outer ring float over the movement. 

Omega, a Swiss watchmaker founded in 1848, has a rich history of innovation and precision. The company's vision was carried on by its sons Louis-Paul and César, who pioneered full watch production under the brand's roof. In 1894, the company unveiled the world's first mass-produced, interchangeable watch movement, the Omega Calibre, which streamlined production and propelled the brand to international fame.

As the 20th century began, Omega watches became at the forefront of timekeeping technology and revolutionized sports watches with their precision. The Olympic Games provided an ideal stage for Omega to demonstrate its exceptional timekeeping abilities. In 1932, Omega began its role as Official Olympic Timekeeper, starting an enduring partnership spanning over 80 years. With each Games, Omega introduced groundbreaking timekeeping innovations, such as the first photo finish camera at the 1948 London Olympics.

Omega's contributions to spaceflight began in 1962 when the Omega Speedmaster became the first watch worn in space on Mercury-Atlas 6. Its defining moment came in 1969 with the Apollo 11 moon landing, where Buzz Aldrin stepped onto the moon wearing his trusty Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch. The company played an indispensable role in NASA's pioneering '60s space missions, including the Apollo 13 mission, where the Speedmaster timed the engine burn, ensuring the crew's safe descent to Earth.

Omega's cultural impact extends into pop culture through a long-running cinematic partnership with James Bond Movies. Since 1995's GoldenEye, James Bond has sported Omega watches on the silver screen, wearing the Seamaster Diver 300M and the rugged Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean.

Omega remains dedicated to exploring new technological frontiers today, with innovations like the battery-free Pictograms model, wearable tech collaborations, and energy-harnessing movements driving progress and cementing its place in history.




2003 Omega Louis Brandt Perpetual Calendar Skeleton

Free

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  • 5349.80.83
  • Box, Card, Card Holder, 2x Buckles, Push Pin

Year: 2003
Model: Louis Brandt
Case Diameter: 34mm 
Lug to Lug: 42mm
Case: Yellow Gold
Condition: No significant wear as seen
Dial: Blue
Movement: Automatic

Condition
The case is very clean with all the markings still intact. The crystals on the case and caseback have no dings or flea bites. The skeleton dial is very clean with a few very light marks on the moon from normal functioning. The movement had a recent service in 2022 and is running perfectly.

The Louis Brandt line, a luxury watch brand, was a halo product in the 1980s and 1990s, featuring gold cases and complex movements. The Louis Brandt De-Luxe Chronograph, powered by the ETA 7750 movement, was priced above other Omega watches. The watch was designed to be both high tech and modern, but still too old to be considered modern. The case is 38mm in diameter and features a thick, flat bezel and pronounced "beefy" lugs. The watch has a water resistance of 30 meters and is compatible with various OEM Omega straps. The Calibre 1156, 1157, and 1158 movements are heavily modified de-luxe variants of the Omega Calibre 1155, which is a modified version of the ETA 7750 base movement. These movements are meant to be serviced by Omega in Bienne only, and independent watchmakers cannot order replacement parts for worn parts.

The Louis Brandt Chronograph Blue Skeleton is a rare and impressive watch. Some say only four of these examples were ever produced. It features a blue skeleton and is powered by the impressively finished Omega Calibre 1117 movement. The movement is a thick, multi-plate sandwich, making it difficult to allow light from the back to the front. To make the dial unique, Omega applied blue and gold paint to a transparent sapphire, creating a floating effect. The sub-dials and outer ring float over the movement. 

Omega, a Swiss watchmaker founded in 1848, has a rich history of innovation and precision. The company's vision was carried on by its sons Louis-Paul and César, who pioneered full watch production under the brand's roof. In 1894, the company unveiled the world's first mass-produced, interchangeable watch movement, the Omega Calibre, which streamlined production and propelled the brand to international fame.

As the 20th century began, Omega watches became at the forefront of timekeeping technology and revolutionized sports watches with their precision. The Olympic Games provided an ideal stage for Omega to demonstrate its exceptional timekeeping abilities. In 1932, Omega began its role as Official Olympic Timekeeper, starting an enduring partnership spanning over 80 years. With each Games, Omega introduced groundbreaking timekeeping innovations, such as the first photo finish camera at the 1948 London Olympics.

Omega's contributions to spaceflight began in 1962 when the Omega Speedmaster became the first watch worn in space on Mercury-Atlas 6. Its defining moment came in 1969 with the Apollo 11 moon landing, where Buzz Aldrin stepped onto the moon wearing his trusty Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch. The company played an indispensable role in NASA's pioneering '60s space missions, including the Apollo 13 mission, where the Speedmaster timed the engine burn, ensuring the crew's safe descent to Earth.

Omega's cultural impact extends into pop culture through a long-running cinematic partnership with James Bond Movies. Since 1995's GoldenEye, James Bond has sported Omega watches on the silver screen, wearing the Seamaster Diver 300M and the rugged Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean.

Omega remains dedicated to exploring new technological frontiers today, with innovations like the battery-free Pictograms model, wearable tech collaborations, and energy-harnessing movements driving progress and cementing its place in history.